Braxtel Communications Announce Open Source Contact Centre

Braxtel Communications the Nottinghamshire based Contact Centre Company has announced the release date of their new Open Source Contact Centre solution, Contact Q.

This global release is targeted to be 1 April 2010. The company says their product will immediately provide a number of distinct benefits to channel partners and of course end user customers.

Braxtel see these as being an Enterprise feature set including IVR, ACD, Call recording, CTI with comprehensive management reporting delivered into the SMB space and a Linux based product with total browser based interface and simple configuration.

The company says this totally SIP based solution can integrate into any IP based PBX or legacy telephone system via TDM gateways and can be totally hosted without loss of feature set or changes in configuration.

The initial version is totally free and can be downloaded at www.Braxtel.com, this provides free access to the product’s source code as well as daily updates of an easy to install appliance.

Braxtel created the Contact Q contact centre software by building on the experience gained from developing its established offering, the Fluency Communications Suite. In addition to contact centre software, Braxtel delivers installation and support services to its business partners worldwide. The company has over 13 years of experience implementing automated call distributor (ACD), interactive voice response (IVR), call recording and dialler applications and has long worked with traditional PBX vendors such as Avaya, Cisco and Nortel and have now integrated relationships with the leading open source PBX vendors such as Asterisk.

Nick Thwaites, CEO of Braxtel Communications, said: “We are excited about the long awaited release of Contact Q. If you look carefully a very powerful trend is emerging, UK and US Governments both encourage Open Source adoption as it massively lowers the bill to the tax payer for public sector offices to increase efficiency and yet reduce costs.”

Thwaites went on to say “OK, Open Source is the buzz word right now and indeed if you look at where its being adopted its is far reaching, from CRM software to SIP Stacks and complete telephony packages but in reality it is more about value for money and in our current economic climate with the existing threat from new economies in the far east Open Source is a strong weapon in helping UK companies stay competitive and grow margins!”