BT Leads Consortium to Drive Technology Transfer Between India and the UK

BT is leading a consortium of 22 industry and academic partners to launch the India-UK Advanced Technology Centre (IU-ATC). This research and innovation centre will drive collaborative research programmes and technology transfer between the UK and India. The consortium has already secured over $3 million to establish the first ever India-UK virtual graduate research school, which will support collaborative PhD and Post doctorate projects and a programme of exchange visits within the IU-ATC consortium.

The IU-ATC will conduct breakthrough research into current and next generation fixed and wireless communications, with the aim of becoming a global Centre of Excellence for next generation network (NGN) and ICT research. Outputs will include the development of new services and technology solutions and the filing of viable patents, as well as the commercial exploitation of research through licensing and spinning out start-up companies.

Matt Bross, Group Chief Technology Officer at BT, said, ” The IU-ATC will accelerate competitive technology and knowledge transfer between the UK and India, as well as ensuring stronger collaborations between industry and academic institutions in both countries. The launch of the IU-ATC is a result of BT’s open approach to innovation – an approach that unleashes innovation beyond the boundaries of BT and enables us to harness the energy and creativity of the best and brightest minds globally.”

The IU-ATC’s UK academic lead, Professor. Gerard Parr from the University of Ulster, said, “The IU-ATC has been set up to establish, for the first time, the support infrastructure and creative sponsorship opportunities that will enable successful collaboration between Britain and India’s academic institutions, government and industry in general. The long-term success of this kind of large scale initiative is dependent upon the support received from industry, and we have had excellent engagement and support from BT, Indian organisations and the British and Indian governments.”