Mobile Club Manager offers fans a new football gaming experience

Want to beat Sir Alex Ferguson or Luis Filipe Scolari at their own game? Sanco has developed and launched a new football management simulation game for Java-enabled mobile phones.

Users can compete against real people rather than play against a machine. And, unlike other multiplayer games, it is not necessary for individual managers to stay connected in order for their role in the game world to continue to exist.

During each match, users can choose to receive Premium SMS messages (priced at 25p per update) providing real time information on the game as it progresses, including goals, substitutions and bookings.

In addition, four training games will be available from launch, designed to allow managers to improve key aspects of player and team performance throughout the season, including Shot Stopping, Ball Control, Shot Accuracy and Strength. Further games will be introduced to improve other player attributes as the season progresses, each at a cost of £1.50 per game.

Sanco software and business consultant, Nabil Sarwar, said: “With the introduction of Mobile Club Manager, the new season has got off to a spectacular start for gaming fans. Both the mobile gaming and fantasy football markets have seen dramatic growth in recent seasons; Mobile Club Manager now takes this to a new and exciting level, by enabling users to get fully involved in all aspects of football management across the whole season.”

He added: “As a Mobile Club Manager, you get to choose and train your team, have responsibility for tactics and strategy and dabble in the transfer market. All this information is sent wirelessly via WAP/GPRS to our website. Matches are scheduled over a 38-game season with the aim of your team becoming the first ‘MCM League Champions’.”

The launch follows a successful trial of the system during Euro 2008. Designed from the ground up using mobile technology, Mobile Club Manager does not suffer the connectivity and mobility limitations of PC games ported over to the mobile phone, the company claimed.