2010 a Key Date for VoIP say IDATE

The corporate voice market is currently in the process of switching from traditional telephony to ToIP. The latest IDATE market report examines the options available to businesses when migrating to IP telephony, gauges the current state of the migration, positions the offers being marketed by the leading players and supplies a growth outlook for both supply and demand.

The telephony over IP (ToIP) market is growing steadily and irreversibly, to the detriment of traditional (TDM) solutions. The larger the enterprise and the more sites it operates, the greater the likelihood of ToIP take-up: in France, for instance, 12% of SMEs were equipped with a VoIP solution at the start of 2006, compared to 56% of large corporations. These percentages have been rising steadily ever since, and particularly swiftly in the SME segment.

Against this backdrop, and now that operators are all having to forge themselves a position in this market, several key trends are emerging:

IP Centrex is expected to be an increasingly popular product for telcos, even if it is still little used by enterprises in Europe; competition between equipment suppliers is heating up, with traditional vendors (with an existing client base) and new entrants marketing full VoIP solutions vying for market share; the integrator and operator market has been restructured.

Market outlook up to 2010

The IDATE report also highlights:

Over the course of 2007-2010, demand for hybrid solutions will decrease – being overtaken by full IP solutions based on IP PBX and IP handsets.

IDATE forecasts that, in 2010, roughly 70% of all phone lines will operate over IP ports – with the remaining 30% still over TDM.

The installed IP base will be divided between full IP, IP PBX, hybrid IP PBX and IP Centrex solutions.

As concerns IP Centrex, the most optimistic forecasts predict a 20% market share (in terms of ports) worldwide by 2010 – a percentage that will likely be lower in Europe.

Mobile PBX solutions are expected to remain peripheral in the medium term, accounting for less than 10% of the market in 2010.