Eliminating PBX downtime is only half of the story, says ipcortex

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UK based vendor ipcortex have introduced high availability functionality as a standard feature of their medium and high end VoIPCortex IP PBX units. Available from version 4.0 of the VoIPCortex platform, the feature not only provides swift failover of operations from one unit to another but continuously synchronises all data – including voicemails, call recordings, logs, statistics and system configuration information. This means that the secondary unit can take over where the primary left off, resulting in a level of synchronisation and hand-over that ipcortex believe is unprecedented in the open IP PBX market.

Rob Pickering, ipcortex Director says, “Making call functions fail over from one unit to another is only a small part of the redundancy story. For high availability to be truly useful, and what sets our solution apart from the competition, is that the process needs to be as seamless as possible – losing access to voicemails, logs or recordings, or undoing recent configuration changes is simply not an option.”

ipcortex have seen considerable market pressure for greater levels of resilience as the inevitable result of a growing dependence on unified communication systems.

“It’s never been more important for resellers to consider the resilience of the solutions they offer,” Pickering continues. “With a wide range of sophisticated functionality now available to organisations of all sizes, we’ve seen the phone system take on far greater responsibility and become central to more business tasks and processes than ever before. For its services to be unavailable, if only for a short time, carries a real and calculable risk. VoIPCortex high availability doesn’t require any licences or bolt ons, making it straightforward for resellers to offer highly resilient solutions with a low TCO so that they can very easily present the case for a real return on investment. High availability is no longer a question of ‘why?’ – it’s a question of ‘why not?’”